Treaty with the Wabash and Illinois, 1792

ORIGINAL SIGNATORIES

KEY PROVISIONS

Treaty with the Wabash and Illinois, 1792

A Treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between the President of the United States of America, on the part of the said States, and the undersigned, kings, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wabash and Illinois Indian tribes, on the part and behalf of the said tribes.

The parties being desirous of establishing a permanent peace and friendship, between the United States and the said Indian tribes,and the citizens and members thereof, and to remove the causes of war, the President of the United States, by Rufus Putnam, one of the Judges of the territory of the United States, northwest of the river Ohio, and Brigadier General in the army, whom he hath vested with full powers for these purposes; and the said Wabash and Illinois Indian tribes, by the undersigned kings, chiefs, and warriors, representing the said tribes have, agreed to the following articles, viz:

ARTICLE 1.

There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals, villages, and tribes, of the said Wabash and Illinois Indians.

ART. 2.

The undersigned kings, chiefs, and warriors, for themselves, and all parts of their villages and tribes, do acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and stipulate to live in amity and friendship with them.

ART. 3.

The said tribes shall deliver, as soon as practicable, to the commanding officer at fort Knox, all citizens of the United States, white inhabitants or negroes, who are now prisoners among any of the said tribes.

ART. 4.

The United States solemnly guaranty to the Wabash, and the Illinois nations, or tribes of Indians, all the lands to which they have a just claim; and no part shall eyer be taken from them, but by a fair purchase, and to their satisfaction. That the lands originally belonged to the Indians; it is theirs, and theirs only. That they have a right to sell, and a right to refuse to sell. And that the United States will protect them in their said just rights.

Art. 5.

The said kings, chiefs, and warriors, solemnly promise, on their part, that no future hostilities or depredations shall be committed by them, or any belonging to the tribes they represent, against the persons or property of any of the citizens of the United States. That the practice of stealing negroes and horses from the people of Kentucky, and other inhabitants of the United States, shall forever hereafter cease. That they will, at all times, give notice to the citizens of the United States of any designs which they may know, or suspect to be formed; in any neighboring tribe, or by any person whatever, against the peace and interest of the United States.

ART. 6.

In cases of violence on the persons or property of the individuals of either party, neither retaliation or reprisal shall be committed by the other until satisfaction shall have been demanded of the party, of which the aggressor is, and shall have been refused.

ART. 7.

All animosities for past grievances shall henceforth cease, and the contracting parties will carry the foregoing treaty into full execution, with all good faith and sincerity.

In witness of all and every thing herein determined, between the United States of America and the villages and tribes of the undersigned kings, chiefs, and warriors, the parties have hereunto set their hands and seals, at Post Vincennes, on the Wabash river, this twenty-seventh day of September, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two.

Rufus Putnam,
Brigadier General, and Agent for making peace with the Indians.

[Signed by thirty-one Indians, of the Wasbash and Illinois tribes.]